turning stones

taking for a spin: tools for The Five 8s

Tag Archives: communicate

Send an email to the future you


FutureMe lets you send email messages to yourself at a specified date in the future. Send an email and receive it 30 days or even 30 years from today. It’s an email time capsule where you can write yourself anything you like. It may contain what you are currently feeling, your fears, your aspirations, your rants. And then you get to read them months, even years from now. I am sure you will find some value in that.

Even if FutureMe has been in existence for quite some time(almost 1.3 Million emails sent to the future), I just found out about it recently. I actually forgot all about it already when I received the email I sent to 2 months back to test how it worked. For me, it is like a time capsule which serves as a reminder, not only of the things pertaining to the present, but also of the past. And like a time machine, which brought me back 2 months ago and the prevailing conditions then. Now I’m wondering how it would feel to get an email from myself 1, 5, 10 or 20 years from now.

There is an option where you may make your letter anonymously ‘open’, meaning other people can read what you wrote or to keep it private.

Students may email and tell themselves their objectives and expectations of a certain course. It may be a good exercise of reflection. Click here to send your future you an email.

Enhanced by Zemanta
Advertisements

Chop that YouTube Video


Image representing TubeChop as depicted in Cru...

Image via CrunchBase

Let’s say I am a Football coach and I wanted to show my team a particular highlight of the recent Philippine Azkals’ unprecedented win over defending champion Vietnam in the current Asian Football Federation Suzuki Cup 2010. I search for videos of the game in YouTube and I find this which is 6:31 minutes long. However the part I wanted to show my team is just the Philippines’ second goal by Phil Younghusband. And it’s only 27 seconds long. What could be the simple and easy way for me to do that?

Enter TubeChop, a site where you can paste the URL of the original video you found, and chop it so you can have just the particular footage you need. Just slide the left and right black bars to contain the particular footage you want to use, then click the ‘chop it’ button. In no time at all, it’ll give you a new URL for your shortened video. You can visit tubechop.com, paste in the new URL and it’ll play your chopped video. Also, TubeChop gives you an embed code which you can use for your website or blog.

Click here to view my 27-second ‘chopped’ video.

 

Related articles

Enhanced by Zemanta

Tell Stories… Your Stories


Showbeyond is a site I learned about from Ana Maria Menezes. A site where you can create a multimedia slidecast and share it online. Sign up for free and start creating. You can easily grab images, add text and sound to create multimedia stories. You can then save and share them publicly on the site, share to friends, post on social networks or on blogs. You may browse the library of slidecasts submitted by users and maybe you can find suitable material for your cl

asses. Here is an example of a slidecast. This is one of the favorite slidecasts in Showbeyond. Find the slidecast I created on the following post.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Here’s the Showbeyond slidecast I created


 

twiducate


Yup… twiducate… no misspelling there. twiducate is social networking for schools. Similar to Edmodo and Kidblog, twiducate introduces kids to social networking, blogging and micro-blogging. It’s a safe environment as all activity is controlled by the teacher including listing up of students without the need for individual email addresses. A free platform for creating your own Twitter-like, micro-blogging site for your class. You can post assignments and messages for your students and others you want to invite into the network. Students can reply to you and to each other.

Watch the video to learn more. Visit twiducate here.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Prezi now supports all common video file…


Prezi now supports all common video file formats. Where before, it was just FLV/F4V, now it’s FLV, F4V, AVI, MOV, WMV, F4V, MPG, MPEG, MP4, M4V, 3GP

http://prezi.com/learn/insert-video/

A nice little resource for the younger s…


A nice little resource for the younger students. Twisty Noodle has thousands of coloring pages and practice writing worksheets. EED Teachers might have a use for this.

Get Your Own Voki


This is a cool app that teachers can use in their classes to motivate students to participate and develop their creativity. Creating a speaking avatar is fun and easy. Visit Voki now.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

blog welcome 3, posted with vodpod

Tell a Compelling Story via Social Media


Social Media is the main buzz nowadays. I’m sure it is becoming more and more difficult to find inhabitants of this planet who have not been exposed to social media. Just some figures I found:

Facebook Stats(www.facebook.com/press/info.php?statistics)

  • More than 500 million active users
  • 50% of active users log on to Facebook in any given day
  • Average user has 130 friends
  • People spend over 700 billion minutes per month on Facebook

Twitter Stats(www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/04/14/twitter-user-statistics-r_n_537992.html)

  • Twitter now has 105,779,710 registered users.
  • New users are signing up at the rate of 300,000 per day.
  • Twitter users are, in total, tweeting an average of 55 million tweets a day.

YouTube Stats(www.website-monitoring.com/blog/2010/05/17/youtube-facts-and-figures-history-statistics/)

  • Exceeds 2 billion views a day
  • 24 hours of video uploaded every minute
  • Average person spends 15 minutes a day on YouTube

Just looking at those stats we realize the power of these networks. And there are so much more than just those 3 most popular sites. They provide terabyte upon terabyte of information. When television/news networks cover events, information is not only provided by their field reporters, information is supplied by many sources. These networks follow trends of events in social media sites, tracking updates from warm bodies who are actually in the scene and airing opinions of those who aren’t. Our hobby or habit of typing updates, letting the world know what is happening around us and what we feel about it can be harnessed to come up with a unique story.

Enter Storify. Storify is a web application used to tell stories with elements from social media like tweets, Facebook updates, YouTube videos, Flickr photos, blog entries or others. You can tell your own story, a school event, news that have global impact, a weather report, a disaster. Readers can go to the original sources quoted and also retweet or reply and interact. When you’re finished, you can let your sources know that you have cited them in your story. You can share it on your social network or embed it on your blog or website.

Visit storify.com and send an email to get an invite. Testing Storify, I created my own simple story about what I did for onedayonearth.org here.

I just added another storify… made it in 5 minutes… here is XS Dress Me A Literary!

Storify from Burt Herman on Vimeo.

Getting Kids to Blog Safely


The Operation NExT Team has been encouraging Xavier School teachers to blog about their professional life, their experiences in and out of the classroom, the technologies and strategies that they use, their insights and successes as teachers and formators. Also WordPress is being introduced to students from Grade 5 to High 4 for them to build and maintain their individual Personal Learning Websites(PLWS).

It’s a great leap for Xavier School as teachers and staff and students are starting to blog. You should visit their sites and take a look at what they have to say and learn what they are learning.

WordPress is the preferred platform due to its robust elements, which includes wide layout flexibility and its more open commenting feature. It can be pretty demanding to the uninitiated, first time user. But it gets easy as you use it. So yes, we feel that WordPress is appropriate to our 5th graders. However, we can go even younger. As early as when we start computer classes in 3rd grade.

And yes, we have an age-appropriate WordPress version for them. Welcome KIDBLOG! A simple and secure site teachers can use to create space for students to blog. Here’s how it works:

  1. teacher creates an account using his/her email address
  2. teacher enters user names and assigns passwords for each student in class
  3. teacher tells students to go to the class site
  4. students see a drop down list of user names and log in
  5. voila… they can start blogging
  6. teacher may want everything to run by him/her for approval before publishing

KidBlog is secure because kids do not have to have their own email addresses. The teacher can have control over all posts, reviewing them before it gets published. The teacher has control over who can view and make comments on the blog; either named users(class members) only, or all visitors. This is also a good way to let parents know what their children are doing and learning in class(if you choose that path).

KidBlog is easy to use. User can upload pictures, link sites and videos and comment on each others works. Even if it is simple and does not have all of its features, it has the look and feel of WordPress. I create a class site for Operation NExT Team members and I made viewing public so anyone can visit kidblog.org/larrydlpsnextclass.

A great and fun way to learn!

%d bloggers like this: